Tag Archives: case study

More ways to launch Enterprise 2.0 at your company

My recent post ‘The use of handouts when launching a site seemed to grab the interest of a few people. Simon Goh is launching an intranet and was on the lookout for launch ideas. Here are a few more we’ve used in the past.

About a year and a half ago Simon and I launched an Enterprise 2.0 effort at a global healthcare company. We started off with grand visions of doing it all online and not printing a single flyer or advert. We were saving the planet at the same time you see. The plan was to use viral marketing techniques and distribute content via the existing intranet and email system. This included edgy graphics, wallpapers, podcasts, videocasts, invites to events, launching an enterprise 2.0 related site and blog and anything else we could think of.

However we soon realised we were missing a massive chunk of the workforce. Large swathes of people in many companies interact with technology only when they need to, and when they do they stick to what they know (in this case email and a few internal news sites served up in IE).

We just had to go offline. So here are some of the things we produced:

  • Business cards (similar to above) with teaser info on the front and more detailed info on the reverse. We handed these out wherever and whenever possible. People liked them and we still see them on desks, shelves and wedged in keyboards today
  • Neschens were printed and put on display in high traffic areas (as in photo). The neschens detailed Enterprise 2.0 events and pointed to online resources
  • Posters – quick and easy, although these ones were quite edgy. Different to most posters you see in large companies. i.e. not “Climb the highest peak of success” with a picture of a mountain….yuk!
  • Handouts – these were more like quick tips on the tools
  • Speakers – we managed to secure some great speakers to inspire people with the possibilities of web2.0 in the workplace
  • Lunch 2.0 type meet-ups – to discuss blogs, wikis, podcasting, anything really

Of course this is just the start. Once you have people interested you need to back it up with the tools, support, pilots, workshops, mentoring etc. I’ll save this for another day.

 

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Behind BT’s Firewall – a glimpse at their intranet

Richard Dennison shares some screenshots and background to BT’s social software powered intranet. I personally like the consistent branding and language. We have also implemented a ‘blog central’ so it was good to see BT have gone through a similar thought process. Great work Richard.

 

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Not excited yet?

Over on the FASTForward blog there is a post from Bill Ives where he asks “is IT looking over it’s shoulder at web2.0?”. The question is in regards to whether IT are really embracing web2.0 or becoming a victim of this looser and ultimately cheaper operating model. There is one quote from this article stating “We’ve cut IT staff by 20%, and we’re providing a whole lot more in terms of IT services.?

When I first started evangelizing web2.0 /enterprise2.0 I was really eager to have the IT crowd as an audience, as I thought they’d be the first to get excited about this stuff. How wrong I was. Out of all the people I speak to and work with, it’s the IT folk who are the least excited about web2.0 use within a company setting. Even in my own IT department at the time there was only a handful of us who saw the potential in this new breed of tools. However, over time we did find some very supportive IT sponsors and supporters, and it was essential we did as working on web2.0 outside of an IT setting is very tough. Maybe the reason is that this ‘stuff’ doesn’t look like a classic solution to a classic problem. In many cases there is not much to build (if you exclude SOA etc), few need to be involved and classic system lifecycle development does not always apply.

So back to the matter at hand. Can embracing web2.0 really reduce costs and increase revenue? Well think about these examples:

  • You are a big company with a dedicated communications team who write and publish material to the intranet. What would happen if you reduced their publishing time and effort by providing a simple blog? And what if everyone in the company had a way to blog to a central news site? Even the ability to DIGG content they thought was valuable? What about the editing process of internal communications. How about you let the author have control of the message and engage on conversations, rather than pass it through several review cycles before publishing to a static page without the ability for the readers to comment?
  • In this big company you also have a team dedicated to rolling out training and help files to end users via a ‘training portal’. Content is authored, published to the training portal and reviewed at regular intervals by interviewing project teams and gathering user feedback. The material is then revised and re-published. How about placing all this in a wiki, and letting users add to and amend based on their own experiences with the system/process being used. Living and evolving training material in the wiki alongside all other system/process related information, and editable by anyone.

I’m not saying the (two random) examples above will necessarily save money/cut staff, but they would shake things up a bit and turn current models on their head. If nothing else it would cause current roles to be re-purposed and revised to facilitate and nurture this new user contributed model.

BTW, I originally missed the post from Bill, as I’m behind on my RSS feeds due to workload and a whole bunch of other stuff that’s been keeping me away from my laptop. However, as a testament to the power of web2.0 behind the firewall, I picked up a link to the post from the front page of the social bookmarking tool we implemented only a couple of months ago. Thanks for the link Bruce 😉

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The Janssen-Cilag/Johnson & Johnson Wiki

The FASTForward blog has a post detailing how Janssen-Cilag, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, implemented a Confulence wiki as their main intranet. 

They needed a system where editing is immediate and very simple. It was more important to let people add content rather than worrying about what they shouldn?t do. At any rate, the risk of letting anyone change anything was low, since the wiki provided a complete history of changes so mistakes can be quickly undone.

It’s interesting to see how they completely replaced the old intranet, dished out just 5 minutes of training, concentrated on owning the flow of new information and mandated it be used for all announcements instead of email.

Full article.

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AT&T embracing Enterprise 2.0

Whilst the organizations I am working with are still in the early phases of Enterprise 2.0 adoption, AT&T are clearly ahead of the game.  Dr. Todd Stephens reports today that his Social Software and and Sharepoint offerings are generating so much demand he’s stopped promoting them in order to satisfy the sudden surge.

Our team is working 12 hours a day just to try to keep up with the enormous demand for our products and services. Our collaborative sites have jumped to almost 25,000 and the Social Software components have doubled in the last 3 weeks.

I spoke  to Todd a few weeks back to share experiences and views on the work we are involved in.  It was clear from our discussion that he’s done a great job in bringing Enterprise 2.0 to a massive company, and it’s also clear that the company is embracing his offerings whole heartedly.  Well done.

http://www.rtodd.com/collaborage/2007/09/crying_uncle_in_enterprise_20.html

 

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Enterprise 2.0 Case Study…

…well sort of. This is the presentation I’ve pulled together to highlight the work of an unofficial group who explore and push web2.0/enterprise2.0 technology and culture at a global blue chip company. We started the group in July 2006 and have enjoyed a great deal of success (and enjoyment) in the year that followed. I’ve removed any references which identify the company, so sorry if some bits seem vague.

http://www.slideshare.net/slgavin/an-enterprise-20-case-study